Celebrating the delights of Chinese New Year

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We are in the month of Chinese New Year for 2019. Across the world people from all backgrounds and culture join in the celebrations for this traditional Chinese event. In Trafalgar Square in London there will be some spectacular celebrations taking place, as there will be across the whole of Chinatown. These events will be well planned with Event Medical Cover in place to ensure everyone’s safety. You can get event medical cover from Outdoor Medical Solutions

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If you aren’t fully aware of the traditions that surround Chinese New Year here are a few facts for you.

This year, 2019 is the year of the Pig and there are 13 animals that each have specific years dedicated to them. The New Year event is also known as Spring Festival as it signifies the end of the coldest period of the year. The date for the festival is movable each year as it is based on the lunar calendar rather than the Gregorian calendar. This year it takes place on 5th February, but the date can range anywhere from 21st January through to 20th February.

When the Spring festival was first celebrated it was an opportunity to praise and thank the Gods and ask them for a fruitful future planting and harvest season. As their society was based so heavily on cultivation, having a plentiful harvest meant prosperity and a good year ahead for the community.

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There is also a myth surrounding the festival that has resulted in the celebration culminating with some incredible fireworks. The story goes that there was a monster called Nian that would visit the area on New Year’s Eve. The locals were so scared of the monster that they would stay in their houses for the entire evening, but there was one young boy who was brave enough to confront Nian. He used firecrackers to fight and chase away the monster. The next day the community celebrated by setting off more firecrackers. This is where the use of fireworks as an integral part of the celebrations began. Firecrackers are still set off at midnight each year and are thought to bring good luck for the year ahead.  Families also burn imitation paper money and gold bars in memory of their loved ones who are no longer around.

The festival lasts for a total of 15 days and is the longest celebration in Chinese tradition. During this time, family is the main focus, and across the world thousands of people will travel back to China to spend this time of year with their loved ones.

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